Synonyms
Etymology

1. caraway

noun. ['ˈkærəˌweɪ, ˈkɛrəˌweɪ'] leaves used sparingly in soups and stews.

Synonyms

  • herb

Etymology

  • carvi (French)

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Rhymes with Caraway Seed Bread

  • hilton-head
  • widespread
  • purebred
  • interbred
  • thoroughbred
  • infrared
  • sffed
  • retread
  • overhead
  • overfed
  • misread
  • misled
  • instead
  • biomed
  • unwed
  • unted
  • unsaid
  • unread
  • spread
  • sayed
  • numed
  • imbed
  • embed
  • behead
  • tread
  • thread
  • szwed
  • swed
  • stead
  • sped

2. caraway

noun. ['ˈkærəˌweɪ, ˈkɛrəˌweɪ'] a Eurasian plant with small white flowers yielding caraway seed.

Synonyms

  • genus Carum
  • herbaceous plant
  • herb
  • Carum
  • Carum carvi
  • caraway seed

Etymology

  • carvi (French)

3. bread

noun. ['ˈbrɛd'] food made from dough of flour or meal and usually raised with yeast or baking powder and then baked.

Synonyms

  • sandwich
  • sourdough bread
  • starches
  • breadstick
  • brown bread
  • bun
  • matzo
  • garlic bread
  • white bread
  • Boston brown bread
  • baked goods
  • bread-stick
  • anadama bread
  • roll
  • bap
  • challah
  • crouton
  • cracked-wheat bread
  • loaf
  • cinnamon bread
  • sour bread
  • naan
  • hallah
  • breadstuff
  • wafer
  • raisin bread
  • onion bread
  • loaf of bread
  • matzah
  • cracker
  • whole wheat bread
  • unleavened bread
  • dark bread
  • English muffin
  • caraway seed bread
  • whole meal bread
  • gluten bread
  • staff of life
  • matzoh
  • salt-rising bread
  • Host
  • flatbread
  • toast
  • quick bread
  • rye bread
  • simnel
  • light bread
  • flour
  • nan

Antonyms

  • unwind
  • uncoil
  • malfunction
  • stand still

Etymology

  • bred (Middle English (1100-1500))

4. bread

noun. ['ˈbrɛd'] informal terms for money.

Synonyms

  • clams
  • cabbage
  • wampum
  • lolly
  • money
  • shekels
  • pelf
  • dinero
  • kale
  • lettuce
  • sugar
  • simoleons
  • moolah
  • scratch
  • boodle
  • dough
  • loot
  • lucre

Antonyms

  • work
  • dishonor
  • cool
  • sour

Etymology

  • bred (Middle English (1100-1500))

5. seed

noun. ['ˈsiːd'] a small hard fruit.

Synonyms

  • ivory nut
  • Mexican jumping bean
  • ash-key
  • vegetable ivory
  • neem seed
  • babassu nut
  • oil-rich seed
  • nicker nut
  • edible seed
  • Job's tears
  • oilseed
  • jumping seed
  • nicker seed
  • caryopsis
  • grain
  • meat
  • cohune nut
  • bean
  • conker
  • coffee berry
  • jumping bean
  • coffee bean
  • pip
  • coquilla nut
  • fruit
  • kernel
  • safflower seed
  • bonduc nut
  • coffee
  • buckeye
  • apple nut
  • horse chestnut

Antonyms

  • summerize
  • ascend
  • rise
  • moving

Etymology

  • seed (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sed (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. seed

noun. ['ˈsiːd'] a mature fertilized plant ovule consisting of an embryo and its food source and having a protective coat or testa.

Synonyms

  • seed vessel
  • testa
  • seed coat
  • ovule
  • episperm
  • pericarp

Antonyms

  • depressurize
  • desynchronize
  • blur
  • desynchronise

Etymology

  • seed (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sed (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. seed

verb. ['ˈsiːd'] go to seed; shed seeds.

Synonyms

  • spill
  • shed
  • disgorge

Antonyms

  • subordinate
  • upper-class
  • middle-class
  • low status

Etymology

  • seed (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sed (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

8. seed

verb. ['ˈsiːd'] help (an enterprise) in its early stages of development by providing seed money.

Antonyms

  • anterior

Etymology

  • seed (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sed (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

9. seed

noun. ['ˈsiːd'] anything that provides inspiration for later work.

Synonyms

  • source
  • germ
  • inspiration
  • muse

Antonyms

  • leave
  • go
  • stay in place
  • stay

Etymology

  • seed (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sed (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

10. seed

verb. ['ˈsiːd'] remove the seeds from.

Synonyms

  • withdraw
  • take
  • take away

Antonyms

  • unready
  • disarranged
  • soft
  • up

Etymology

  • seed (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sed (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
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