Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] perceive by sight or have the power to perceive by sight.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

Rhymes with See Through

  • n92762
  • yabbadabbadoo
  • misconstrue
  • dfw
  • timbuktu
  • long-overdue
  • katmandu
  • kalamazoo
  • hullabaloo
  • lhommedieu
  • komatsu
  • fitzhugh
  • drive-thru
  • depardieu
  • construe
  • benhamou
  • aeroperu
  • withdrew
  • true-view
  • tien-fu
  • thankyou
  • pas-de-deux
  • overthrew
  • kwangju
  • karatsu
  • kangaroo
  • hitherto
  • fondue
  • cmu
  • carilou

2. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] perceive (an idea or situation) mentally.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

3. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] perceive or be contemporaneous with.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] see or watch.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

8. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] come together.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

9. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

10. see

verb. ['ˈsiː'] be careful or certain to do something; make certain of something.

Etymology

  • sedes (Latin)
  • -es (Latin)
  • seen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • seon (Old English (ca. 450-1100))