Synonyms
Etymology

1. German

noun. a person of German nationality.

Synonyms

  • Prussian
  • Deutschland
  • Kraut
  • FRG
  • Bavarian
  • Krauthead
  • Jerry
  • Berliner
  • Boche
  • Teuton
  • Hun
  • Germany
  • Federal Republic of Germany
  • European

Etymology

  • germani (Latin)

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Rhymes with Old High German

  • predetermine
  • mcdurman
  • mcdearmon
  • ungermann
  • determine
  • sturman
  • sterman
  • yurman
  • yerman
  • worman
  • werman
  • turman
  • thurmon
  • thurman
  • terman
  • surman
  • sirmon
  • sirman
  • sherman
  • sermon
  • schurman
  • scherman
  • perman
  • lerhman
  • kurman
  • kerman
  • jerman
  • hermon
  • hermann
  • herman

2. German

noun. the standard German language; developed historically from West Germanic.

Synonyms

  • West Germanic
  • High German
  • Yiddish
  • Middle High German
  • Pennsylvania Dutch
  • German language
  • West Germanic language

Etymology

  • germani (Latin)

3. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] greater than normal in degree or intensity or amount.

Synonyms

  • grade
  • full
  • utmost
  • broad
  • higher
  • superior
  • advanced
  • graduate
  • degree
  • postgraduate
  • level
  • soaring

Antonyms

  • inferior
  • ascend
  • rise
  • pointless

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

4. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] (literal meaning) being at or having a relatively great or specific elevation or upward extension (sometimes used in combinations like `knee-high').

Synonyms

  • up
  • high-altitude
  • high-level
  • height
  • tall
  • high-stepped
  • soaring
  • commanding
  • high-top
  • steep
  • overlooking
  • tallness
  • high-topped
  • eminent
  • top
  • altitudinous
  • dominating
  • upper
  • lofty
  • towering

Antonyms

  • down
  • side
  • bottom
  • low

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

5. high

adverb. ['ˈhaɪ'] at a great altitude.

Antonyms

  • forceless

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

6. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] standing above others in quality or position.

Synonyms

  • superior

Antonyms

  • gradual
  • pleasant

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

7. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] used of sounds and voices; high in pitch or frequency.

Synonyms

  • tenor
  • sopranino
  • shrill
  • pinched
  • falsetto
  • adenoidal
  • treble
  • screaky
  • alto
  • spiky
  • pitch
  • squealing
  • sharp
  • peaky
  • nasal
  • soprano
  • screechy
  • squeaking
  • squeaky
  • altissimo
  • high-pitched

Antonyms

  • dull
  • dullness
  • unperceptive
  • stupid

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

8. old

adjective. ['ˈoʊld'] of long duration; not new.

Synonyms

  • antique
  • long-ago
  • yellow
  • hand-down
  • age
  • stale
  • nonmodern
  • yellowed
  • antediluvian
  • past
  • sunset
  • hoary
  • worn
  • rusty
  • age-old
  • secondhand
  • used
  • noncurrent
  • longtime
  • archaic
  • immemorial
  • patched
  • auld
  • antiquated

Antonyms

  • new
  • modern
  • current
  • future
  • present

Etymology

  • old (Middle English (1100-1500))

9. old

adjective. ['ˈoʊld'] (used especially of persons) having lived for a relatively long time or attained a specific age.

Synonyms

  • senescent
  • gray-haired
  • centenarian
  • sexagenarian
  • superannuated
  • gaga
  • middle-aged
  • senior
  • gray
  • experient
  • senile
  • over-the-hill
  • anile
  • darkened
  • age
  • venerable
  • overaged
  • hoar
  • emeritus
  • older
  • grey
  • overage
  • octogenarian
  • grey-headed
  • of age
  • hoary
  • gray-headed
  • white-haired
  • grey-haired
  • ancient
  • oldish
  • elderly
  • mature
  • grizzly
  • doddering
  • nonagenarian
  • experienced
  • ageing
  • aging
  • doddery

Antonyms

  • inexperienced
  • young
  • immature
  • unskilled

Etymology

  • old (Middle English (1100-1500))

10. old

adjective. ['ˈoʊld'] (used for emphasis) very familiar.

Antonyms

  • discolor

Etymology

  • old (Middle English (1100-1500))
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