Synonyms
Antonyms

1. high-pitched

adjective. used of sounds and voices; high in pitch or frequency.

Synonyms

  • tenor
  • sopranino
  • shrill
  • high
  • pinched
  • falsetto
  • adenoidal
  • treble
  • screaky
  • alto
  • spiky
  • pitch
  • squealing
  • sharp
  • peaky
  • nasal
  • soprano
  • screechy
  • squeaking
  • squeaky
  • altissimo

Antonyms

  • colorless
  • beseeching
  • short
  • down

Featured Games

Words that Rhyme with High Gear

  • conventioneer
  • bioengineer
  • reengineer
  • pamphleteer
  • electioneer
  • charpentier
  • volunteer
  • rensselaer
  • profiteer
  • mutineer
  • marketeer
  • lagardere
  • insincere
  • imagineer
  • gondolier
  • financiere
  • financier
  • crochetiere
  • commandeer
  • chandelier
  • brigadier
  • brigadeer
  • bombardier
  • belvedere
  • bandolier
  • wagoneer
  • summiteer
  • st_cyr
  • souvenir
  • racketeer

Example sentences of the word high-gear


1. Noun Phrase
To become more proactive in your business, kick your empathy skills into high gear.

2. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] greater than normal in degree or intensity or amount.

Synonyms

  • grade
  • full
  • utmost
  • broad
  • higher
  • superior
  • advanced
  • graduate
  • degree
  • postgraduate
  • level
  • soaring

Antonyms

  • inferior
  • ascend
  • rise
  • pointless

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

3. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] (literal meaning) being at or having a relatively great or specific elevation or upward extension (sometimes used in combinations like `knee-high').

Synonyms

  • up
  • high-altitude
  • high-level
  • height
  • tall
  • high-stepped
  • soaring
  • commanding
  • high-top
  • steep
  • overlooking
  • tallness
  • high-topped
  • eminent
  • top
  • altitudinous
  • dominating
  • upper
  • lofty
  • towering

Antonyms

  • down
  • side
  • bottom
  • low

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

4. high

adverb. ['ˈhaɪ'] at a great altitude.

Antonyms

  • forceless

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

5. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] standing above others in quality or position.

Synonyms

  • superior

Antonyms

  • gradual
  • pleasant

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

6. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] used of sounds and voices; high in pitch or frequency.

Synonyms

  • tenor
  • sopranino
  • shrill
  • pinched
  • falsetto
  • adenoidal
  • treble
  • screaky
  • alto
  • spiky
  • pitch
  • squealing
  • sharp
  • peaky
  • nasal
  • soprano
  • screechy
  • squeaking
  • squeaky
  • altissimo
  • high-pitched

Antonyms

  • dull
  • dullness
  • unperceptive
  • stupid

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

7. gear

verb. ['ˈgɪr'] set the level or character of.

Synonyms

  • popularize
  • pitch
  • accommodate
  • adapt

Antonyms

  • elated
  • estimable
  • proud
  • sufficient

Etymology

  • gervi (Old Norse)

8. high

noun. ['ˈhaɪ'] a lofty level or position or degree.

Synonyms

  • level
  • grade

Antonyms

  • asleep
  • decrease
  • unfinished

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))

9. gear

noun. ['ˈgɪr'] a toothed wheel that engages another toothed mechanism in order to change the speed or direction of transmitted motion.

Synonyms

  • worm gear
  • spur gear
  • escape wheel
  • bevel gear
  • planet wheel
  • pinion and ring gear
  • planet gear
  • sun gear
  • planetary gear
  • geared wheel
  • sprocket
  • cogwheel
  • spur wheel
  • tooth
  • gear wheel
  • pinion and crown wheel
  • cog
  • epicyclic gear
  • pinion
  • worm wheel
  • rack and pinion

Antonyms

  • walk
  • disjoin
  • enable
  • rural area

Etymology

  • gervi (Old Norse)

10. high

adjective. ['ˈhaɪ'] happy and excited and energetic.

Synonyms

  • elated

Antonyms

  • colorless
  • beseeching

Etymology

  • high (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • hiȝe (Middle English (1100-1500))
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