Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. thread

noun. ['ˈθrɛd'] a fine cord of twisted fibers (of cotton or silk or wool or nylon etc.) used in sewing and weaving.

Synonyms

  • tinsel
  • nap
  • worsted yarn
  • cotton
  • worsted
  • woof
  • warp
  • ligature
  • purl
  • filling
  • cord
  • metallic
  • pick
  • Lastex
  • dental floss
  • floss
  • weft
  • pile
  • yarn

Antonyms

  • spread
  • praise
  • push
  • straight line

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))

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Words that Rhyme with Thread

  • hilton-head
  • widespread
  • purebred
  • interbred
  • thoroughbred
  • infrared
  • sffed
  • retread
  • overhead
  • overfed
  • misread
  • misled
  • instead
  • biomed
  • unwed
  • unted
  • unsaid
  • unread
  • spread
  • sayed
  • numed
  • imbed
  • embed
  • behead
  • tread
  • szwed
  • swed
  • stead
  • sped
  • sledd

How do you pronounce thread?

Pronounce thread as θrɛd.

US - How to pronounce thread in American English

UK - How to pronounce thread in British English

Example sentences of the word thread


1. Noun, singular or mass
Trim the thread close to the knot, and work the knot into the seam to hide the thread.

2. Adjective
Portion out a piece of thread twice the size of your forearm.

3. Verb, base form
Once it's dry, you can thread a string or ribbon through it.

Quotes containing the word thread


1. I'll always stay connected with Apple. I hope that throughout my life I'll sort of have the thread of my life and the thread of Apple weave in and out of each other, like a tapestry. There may be a few years when I'm not there, but I'll always come back.
- Steve Jobs

2. I have enjoyed most particularly reading the correspondence between Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss. The genuine friendship, competitiveness and support that thread through their communications are life lessons for us all.
- Jessye Norman

3. Forgiveness is that subtle thread that binds both love and friendship. Without forgiveness, you may not even have a child one day.
- George Foreman

2. thread-fish

noun. fish having greatly elongated front rays on dorsal and anal fins.

Synonyms

  • Alectis
  • jack
  • genus Alectis
  • threadfish

3. thread

verb. ['ˈθrɛd'] pass a thread through.

Synonyms

  • run
  • draw
  • guide

Antonyms

  • refrain
  • closing
  • opening
  • retreat

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))

4. thread

verb. ['ˈθrɛd'] to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course.

Synonyms

  • move
  • travel
  • snake
  • wander
  • go
  • locomote
  • wind
  • weave

Antonyms

  • gladden
  • move in
  • move out
  • stay

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))

5. thread

noun. ['ˈθrɛd'] any long object resembling a thin line.

Synonyms

  • blade
  • object
  • ribbon

Antonyms

  • ascend
  • go
  • rise
  • precede

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))

6. thread

noun. ['ˈθrɛd'] the raised helical rib going around a screw.

Synonyms

  • rib
  • screw

Antonyms

  • wake
  • dislike
  • untie

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))

7. thread

noun. ['ˈθrɛd'] the connections that link the various parts of an event or argument together.

Synonyms

  • thought
  • thinking
  • thought process
  • mentation
  • train of thought
  • cerebration

Antonyms

  • linger
  • recede
  • ride
  • follow

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))

8. thread

verb. ['ˈθrɛd'] thread on or as if on a string.

Synonyms

  • guide
  • run
  • draw
  • bead
  • arrange
  • set up
  • wire
  • string

Antonyms

  • advance
  • rush
  • converge
  • enter

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))

9. thread

verb. ['ˈθrɛd'] pass through or into.

Synonyms

  • run
  • draw
  • guide

Antonyms

  • stand still
  • raise
  • pull
  • unwind

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))

10. thread

verb. ['ˈθrɛd'] remove facial hair by tying a fine string around it and pulling at the string.

Synonyms

  • pull
  • pull out
  • extract
  • pull up
  • draw out

Antonyms

  • disengage
  • wind
  • back
  • behave

Etymology

  • threed (Middle English (1100-1500))
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