Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. stem

noun. ['ˈstɛm'] (linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed.

Synonyms

  • root word
  • descriptor
  • signifier
  • theme
  • root
  • word form
  • radical
  • form

Antonyms

  • hot
  • kind
  • concentration
  • nonalignment

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

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Rhymes with Stem

  • cardizem
  • difm
  • rpm
  • ppm
  • pgm
  • mgm
  • condemn
  • mam
  • imm
  • swem
  • schwemm
  • prem
  • p.m.
  • klemme
  • klemm
  • klem
  • clem
  • brem
  • brehm
  • blehm
  • alem
  • them
  • temme
  • schemm
  • rhem
  • remme
  • rem
  • rehm
  • lemm
  • lem

Sentences with stem


1. Noun, singular or mass
The stem should be green but should snap when you bend it.

2. Adjective
It contains stem cells that develop into red and white blood cells and platelets.

Quotes about stem


1. I stood still, vision blurring, and in that moment, I heard my heart break. It was a small, clean sound, like the snapping of a flower's stem.
- Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber

2. With color one obtains an energy that seems to stem from witchcraft.
- Henri Matisse

3. Life is painful. It has thorns, like the stem of a rose. Culture and art are the roses that bloom on the stem. The flower is yourself, your humanity. Art is the liberation of the humanity inside yourself.
- Daisaku Ikeda

2. stem

verb. ['ˈstɛm'] grow out of, have roots in, originate in.

Antonyms

  • discontinue

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

3. stem

noun. ['ˈstɛm'] a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ.

Synonyms

  • branch
  • flower stalk
  • slip
  • stock
  • rhizome
  • halm
  • caudex
  • leaf node
  • tuber
  • tree trunk
  • carpophore
  • gynophore
  • scape
  • phylloclad
  • trunk
  • beanstalk
  • phylloclade
  • stipe
  • bole
  • receptacle
  • rootstock
  • cladode
  • haulm
  • petiolule
  • cutting
  • cornstalk
  • petiole
  • corn stalk
  • axis
  • corm
  • plant organ
  • node
  • bulb
  • leafstalk
  • cane
  • filament
  • culm
  • sporangiophore
  • internode
  • funiculus
  • rootstalk
  • funicle
  • cladophyll

Antonyms

  • ascending node
  • antinode
  • unfasten
  • atonality

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

4. stem

noun. ['ˈstɛm'] cylinder forming a long narrow part of something.

Synonyms

  • cylinder
  • key
  • grip
  • handgrip
  • wineglass
  • nail
  • ground tackle
  • pin
  • hold
  • handle
  • shank

Antonyms

  • stand still
  • original
  • overstock
  • understock

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. stem

verb. ['ˈstɛm'] cause to point inward.

Antonyms

  • defy

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. stem

noun. ['ˈstɛm'] a turn made in skiing; the back of one ski is forced outward and the other ski is brought parallel to it.

Synonyms

  • stem turn
  • turn

Antonyms

  • converge
  • tributary
  • distributary

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. stem

verb. ['ˈstɛm'] stop the flow of a liquid.

Synonyms

  • check
  • halt
  • staunch

Antonyms

  • derestrict
  • deny
  • enable
  • disagree

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

8. stem

noun. ['ˈstɛm'] front part of a vessel or aircraft.

Synonyms

  • vessel
  • fore
  • front
  • bow
  • prow

Antonyms

  • natural object
  • overgarment
  • better
  • remember

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

9. stem

noun. ['ˈstɛm'] the tube of a tobacco pipe.

Synonyms

  • pipe
  • tobacco pipe
  • tube

Antonyms

  • disrepute
  • nonstandard
  • out-basket
  • in-basket

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

10. stem

verb. ['ˈstɛm'] remove the stem from.

Synonyms

  • remove
  • take
  • take away

Antonyms

  • bore
  • fail
  • detach
  • defeat

Etymology

  • stemma (Old Norse)
  • stemn (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
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