Antonyms
Etymology

1. full-time

adjective. ['ˈfʊlˌtaɪm'] for the entire time appropriate to an activity.

Antonyms

  • unrhythmical

Etymology

  • full (English)
  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • time (English)
  • time (Middle English (1100-1500))

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Words that Rhyme with Full Moon

  • contrabassoon
  • wotherspoon
  • viromune
  • inopportune
  • picayune
  • ducommun
  • afternoon
  • terhune
  • rangoon
  • pontoon
  • platoon
  • opportune
  • muldoon
  • monsoon
  • mckune
  • mccune
  • mccuen
  • mcclune
  • majnoon
  • lampoon
  • impugn
  • huntoon
  • harpoon
  • hamdoon
  • festoon
  • disharoon
  • dekroon
  • commune
  • cartoon
  • cardoon

2. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] containing as much or as many as is possible or normal.

Synonyms

  • loaded
  • egg-filled
  • engorged
  • fullness
  • inundated
  • overladen
  • ladened
  • pregnant
  • fraught
  • chockful
  • chuck-full
  • cram full
  • chock-full
  • replete
  • riddled
  • glutted
  • gas-filled
  • stuffed
  • choke-full
  • untouched
  • brimful
  • congested
  • weighed down
  • instinct
  • untasted
  • overloaded
  • brimming
  • filled
  • chockablock
  • overflowing
  • air-filled
  • well-lined
  • brimfull
  • awash
  • flooded
  • sperm-filled
  • afloat
  • laden
  • heavy

Antonyms

  • emptiness
  • meaningless
  • untroubled
  • abstain

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

3. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] constituting the full quantity or extent; complete.

Synonyms

  • whole
  • entire

Antonyms

  • littleness
  • smallness
  • incompleteness

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

4. Moon

noun. the natural satellite of the Earth.

Antonyms

  • bright

Etymology

  • mona (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] complete in extent or degree and in every particular.

Synonyms

  • total

Antonyms

  • noncomprehensive
  • nonpregnant

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

6. full

adverb. ['ˈfʊl'] to the greatest degree or extent; completely or entirely; (`full' in this sense is used as a combining form).

Synonyms

  • to the full

Antonyms

  • light
  • effortless

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

7. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] filled to satisfaction with food or drink.

Synonyms

  • nourished

Antonyms

  • unoccupied
  • purposeful

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

8. moon

noun. ['ˈmuːn'] any object resembling a moon.

Synonyms

  • object

Antonyms

  • active
  • profitable

Etymology

  • mone (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • mona (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

9. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] having the normally expected amount.

Synonyms

  • good

Antonyms

  • sober
  • poor

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

10. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] (of sound) having marked deepness and body.

Synonyms

  • rumbling
  • grumbling
  • sounding
  • pear-shaped
  • plangent
  • rich
  • stentorian
  • sonorous
  • booming
  • round
  • orotund
  • heavy

Antonyms

  • emotional
  • moved
  • unburdened
  • inaptitude

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

Example sentences of the word full-moon


1. Noun Phrase
While dogs have been known to bark at a bright full moon, the reasons they do so may not be exactly what you'd expect.

2. Noun Phrase
Moritz recommends doing it on a weekend, when you have enough time to rest and not on a full moon day, when your body tends to retain water.

3. Noun Phrase
A full moon rises in the night and the dogs in the neighborhood go crazy, barking like there's no tomorrow.

4. Noun Phrase
Dogs may bark at a full moon because it is brighter outside, and some have speculated that dogs (who have far better natural night vision than humans) may find the brighter rays to be disturbing.

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