Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] having strength or power greater than average or expected.

Synonyms

  • fortified
  • muscular
  • ironlike
  • stiff
  • reinforced
  • hefty
  • knockout
  • severe
  • bullocky
  • hard
  • beefed-up
  • beardown
  • brawny
  • vehement
  • rugged
  • well-knit
  • toughened
  • noticeable
  • tough
  • bullnecked
  • robust
  • industrial-strength
  • sinewy
  • strength
  • knock-down
  • well-set
  • powerful
  • weapons-grade
  • virile

Antonyms

  • frail
  • delicate
  • weak
  • powerless
  • tender

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

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Words that Rhyme with Strong

  • vietcong
  • guangdong
  • yearlong
  • xudong
  • see-kiong
  • prolong
  • lifelong
  • hong-kong
  • drepung
  • zedong
  • yuzong
  • xuedong
  • sprong
  • pudong
  • hmong
  • delong
  • dejongh
  • dejonge
  • dejong
  • belong
  • vuong
  • truong
  • throng
  • stong
  • spong
  • sarong
  • quang
  • prong
  • phuong
  • luong

How do you spell strong? Is it storng ?

A common misspelling of strong is storng

Example sentences of the word strong


1. Adjective
His urine smell will be strong, and he may try to mount any female cats in the household.

Quotes containing the word strong


1. All that is gold does not glitter,Not all those who wander are lost;The old that is strong does not wither,Deep roots are not reached by the frost.From the ashes a fire shall be woken,A light from the shadows shall spring;Renewed shall be blade that was broken,The crownless again shall be king.
- J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

2. A woman is like a tea bag; you never know how strong it is until it's in hot water.
- Eleanor Roosevelt

3. If the blood humor is too strong and robust, calm it with balance and harmony.
- Xun Zi

2. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] not faint or feeble.

Antonyms

  • woman

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

3. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] having or wielding force or authority.

Synonyms

  • potent

Antonyms

  • mobile
  • unimproved

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

4. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] of good quality and condition; solidly built.

Synonyms

  • solid
  • substantial

Antonyms

  • light
  • man
  • noncritical

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] freshly made or left.

Synonyms

  • fresh

Antonyms

  • ectomorphic
  • sober

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] being distilled rather than fermented; having a high alcoholic content.

Synonyms

  • hard

Antonyms

  • irresolute
  • informal

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] strong and sure.

Synonyms

  • forceful

Antonyms

  • unprotected
  • endomorphic

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

8. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] having a strong physiological or chemical effect.

Synonyms

  • equipotent
  • potency
  • potent
  • stiff
  • efficacious
  • effectual
  • effective
  • multipotent
  • effectiveness
  • strength
  • fertile

Antonyms

  • powerless
  • ineffective
  • impotent
  • flexible

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

9. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] of verbs not having standard (or regular) inflection.

Antonyms

  • inconsiderable

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

10. strong

adjective. ['ˈstrɔŋ'] immune to attack; incapable of being tampered with.

Synonyms

  • unattackable
  • invulnerable
  • impregnable
  • secure
  • inviolable

Antonyms

  • fancy
  • indulgent
  • good
  • easy

Etymology

  • strong (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • strang (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
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