Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. let

verb. ['ˈlɛt'] make it possible through a specific action or lack of action for something to happen.

Synonyms

  • allow
  • permit

Antonyms

  • convict
  • obfuscate
  • guilty

Etymology

  • leten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • letten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • lettan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

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Words that Rhyme with Let

  • suffragette
  • sobriquet
  • minuet
  • luncheonette
  • galudet
  • falconet
  • dancanet
  • clarinet
  • calumet
  • antoinette
  • willamette
  • tagamet
  • statuette
  • slushayete
  • silhouette
  • sextet
  • quintet
  • quartet
  • pinochet
  • lorgnette
  • larroquette
  • kitchenette
  • intermet
  • henriette
  • cullinet
  • coronet
  • cartrette
  • blanchette
  • bernadette
  • baronet

Example sentences of the word let


1. Verb, base form
Once you've issued a refund, you have no choice but to let the payment go through.

Quotes containing the word let


1. I believe that everything happens for a reason. People change so that you can learn to let go, things go wrong so that you appreciate them when they're right, you believe lies so you eventually learn to trust no one but yourself, and sometimes good things fall apart so better things can fall together.
- Marilyn Monroe

2. It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.
- Leonardo da Vinci

3. Love is the flower you've got to let grow.
- John Lennon

2. let

verb. ['ˈlɛt'] actively cause something to happen.

Synonyms

  • make
  • stimulate
  • cause
  • get
  • induce

Antonyms

  • ambiguous
  • obscurity
  • incomprehensible
  • indefinite

Etymology

  • leten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • letten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • lettan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

3. let

verb. ['ˈlɛt'] consent to, give permission.

Synonyms

  • stick out
  • support
  • clear
  • give
  • consent
  • intromit
  • privilege
  • digest
  • trust
  • pass
  • allow in
  • let in
  • legitimate
  • legalize
  • permit
  • legitimise
  • authorise
  • put up
  • authorize
  • legitimatise
  • favor
  • include
  • bear
  • stand
  • go for
  • countenance
  • furlough
  • grant
  • decriminalise
  • suffer
  • legitimatize
  • tolerate
  • brook
  • accept
  • admit
  • legalise
  • legitimize
  • decriminalize
  • favour
  • allow
  • endure
  • stomach

Antonyms

  • criminalize
  • refuse
  • outlaw
  • criminalise
  • disallow
  • reject

Etymology

  • leten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • letten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • lettan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

4. let

verb. ['ˈlɛt'] cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition.

Synonyms

  • have
  • make

Antonyms

  • disapprove
  • disagree
  • inactivity

Etymology

  • leten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • letten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • lettan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. let

verb. ['ˈlɛt'] leave unchanged.

Synonyms

  • leave behind
  • leave

Antonyms

  • lose
  • indistinct
  • unclearness

Etymology

  • leten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • letten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • lettan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. let

verb. ['ˈlɛt'] grant use or occupation of under a term of contract.

Synonyms

  • sublease
  • lease
  • give
  • rent

Antonyms

  • decertify
  • opacity
  • opaque
  • clutter

Etymology

  • leten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • letten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • lettan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. LET

noun. a brutal terrorist group active in Kashmir; fights against India with the goal of restoring Islamic rule of India.

Synonyms

  • Lashkar-e-Tayyiba
  • Army of the Pure
  • Army of the Righteous
  • Lashkar-e-Toiba

8. let

noun. ['ˈlɛt'] a serve that strikes the net before falling into the receiver's court; the ball must be served again.

Synonyms

  • serve
  • net ball

Antonyms

  • disapproval
  • invalidate
  • negate

Etymology

  • leten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • letten (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • lettan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
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