Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. endure

verb. ['ɛndˈjʊr, ɪnˈdʊr'] put up with something or somebody unpleasant.

Synonyms

  • take lying down
  • pay
  • stick out
  • support
  • swallow
  • stand for
  • hold still for
  • digest
  • bear up
  • permit
  • take a joke
  • put up
  • sit out
  • live with
  • bear
  • stand
  • countenance
  • suffer
  • let
  • tolerate
  • brook
  • accept
  • allow
  • stomach

Antonyms

  • disallow
  • pay cash
  • charge
  • underpay

Etymology

  • enduren (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • endurer (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

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Words that Rhyme with Endure

  • entrepreneur
  • pimplapure
  • observateur
  • premature
  • reinsure
  • procure
  • obscure
  • immature
  • beladur
  • amanpour
  • stamour
  • secure
  • rednour
  • reassure
  • mature
  • lumpur
  • lancour
  • impure
  • gochnour
  • gilmour
  • demure
  • brochure
  • bonjour
  • baldur
  • unsure
  • segur
  • mosur
  • manure
  • lesure
  • latour

How do you spell endure? Is it indure ?

A common misspelling of endure is indure

Example sentences of the word endure


1. Verb, base form
Wildlife in these forests may endure the winter or migrate to warmer climates.

2. Adverb
Due to the size of the Expedition, the brake pads endure more punishment than those on smaller vehicles.

3. Noun, singular or mass
The mulch will help protect the roots and help the plant endure freezing and thawing soil.

4. Verb, non-3rd person singular present
Thriving companies that endure always keep an eye out for new opportunities.

Quotes containing the word endure


1. Love cannot endure indifference. It needs to be wanted. Like a lamp, it needs to be fed out of the oil of another's heart, or its flame burns low.
- Henry Ward Beecher

2. Love is always patient and kind. It is never jealous. Love is never boastful or conceited. It is never rude or selfish. It does not take offense and is not resentful. Love takes no pleasure in other people’s sins, but delights in the truth. It is always ready to excuse, to trust, to hope, and to endure whatever comes.
- Anonymous, Holy Bible: New International Version

3. There are two insults no human being will endure: that he has no sense of humor, and that he has never known trouble.
- Sinclair Lewis

2. endure

verb. ['ɛndˈjʊr, ɪnˈdʊr'] continue to live through hardship or adversity.

Synonyms

  • survive
  • hold water
  • be
  • live
  • subsist
  • perennate
  • exist
  • live on
  • hold out
  • go
  • live out
  • last
  • hold up

Antonyms

  • invalidate
  • negate
  • disprove
  • disapprove

Etymology

  • enduren (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • endurer (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

3. endure

verb. ['ɛndˈjʊr, ɪnˈdʊr'] face and withstand with courage.

Synonyms

  • brave out
  • weather
  • hold
  • defy
  • withstand
  • hold up

Antonyms

  • act
  • refrain
  • exclude
  • give

Etymology

  • enduren (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • endurer (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

4. endure

verb. ['ɛndˈjʊr, ɪnˈdʊr'] undergo or be subjected to.

Synonyms

  • suffer
  • tolerate
  • go through
  • see
  • experience

Antonyms

  • overpay
  • take
  • default
  • boycott

Etymology

  • enduren (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • endurer (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

5. endure

verb. ['ɛndˈjʊr, ɪnˈdʊr'] last and be usable.

Synonyms

  • last
  • hold out

Antonyms

  • criminalise
  • reject
  • prevent

Etymology

  • enduren (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • endurer (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

6. endure

verb. ['ɛndˈjʊr, ɪnˈdʊr'] persist for a specified period of time.

Synonyms

  • drag on
  • drag out
  • wear
  • hold out
  • measure
  • last
  • run for

Antonyms

  • integrate
  • stay
  • criminalize
  • refuse

Etymology

  • enduren (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • endurer (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

7. endure

verb. ['ɛndˈjʊr, ɪnˈdʊr'] continue to exist.

Synonyms

  • die hard
  • run
  • carry over
  • continue
  • reverberate
  • persist

Antonyms

  • inactivity
  • abstain
  • disbelieve
  • differ

Etymology

  • enduren (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • endurer (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
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