Antonyms
Etymology

1. full-time

adjective. ['ˈfʊlˌtaɪm'] for the entire time appropriate to an activity.

Antonyms

  • unrhythmical

Etymology

  • full (English)
  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • time (English)
  • time (Middle English (1100-1500))

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Words that Rhyme with Full Scale

  • quesnell
  • deverell
  • cartmell
  • withnail
  • travail
  • tramell
  • sumrell
  • prevail
  • portell
  • parcell
  • mortell
  • mcphail
  • mcgrail
  • marcell
  • macphail
  • exhale
  • carvell
  • cardell
  • bartell
  • averell
  • avenell
  • abimael
  • verrell
  • unveil
  • today'll
  • tirrell
  • surveil
  • savell
  • revell
  • rafale

2. scale

noun. ['ˈskeɪl'] relative magnitude.

Synonyms

  • magnitude relation

Antonyms

  • break even
  • level

Etymology

  • scala (Latin)
  • scando (Latin)
  • scale (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • scealu (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • skál (Old Norse)

3. scale

noun. ['ˈskeɪl'] an ordered reference standard.

Synonyms

  • touchstone
  • logarithmic scale
  • Mohs scale
  • Richter scale
  • temperature scale
  • measure
  • moment magnitude scale
  • criterion
  • wind scale
  • Beaufort scale
  • standard
  • wage scale
  • index
  • graduated table
  • Mercalli scale
  • wage schedule
  • scale of measurement

Antonyms

  • fall back
  • unprofitability
  • disadvantage
  • unprofitableness

Etymology

  • scala (Latin)
  • scando (Latin)
  • scale (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • scealu (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • skál (Old Norse)

4. scale

noun. ['ˈskeɪl'] the ratio between the size of something and a representation of it.

Antonyms

  • unmake

Etymology

  • scala (Latin)
  • scando (Latin)
  • scale (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • scealu (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • skál (Old Norse)

5. scale

noun. ['ˈskeɪl'] a specialized leaf or bract that protects a bud or catkin.

Synonyms

  • scale leaf
  • leaf
  • leafage
  • foliage

Antonyms

  • incapability
  • leave
  • stand still
  • disassemble

Etymology

  • scala (Latin)
  • scando (Latin)
  • scale (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • scealu (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • skál (Old Norse)

6. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] containing as much or as many as is possible or normal.

Synonyms

  • loaded
  • egg-filled
  • engorged
  • fullness
  • inundated
  • overladen
  • ladened
  • pregnant
  • fraught
  • chockful
  • chuck-full
  • cram full
  • chock-full
  • replete
  • riddled
  • glutted
  • gas-filled
  • stuffed
  • choke-full
  • untouched
  • brimful
  • congested
  • weighed down
  • instinct
  • untasted
  • overloaded
  • brimming
  • filled
  • chockablock
  • overflowing
  • air-filled
  • well-lined
  • brimfull
  • awash
  • flooded
  • sperm-filled
  • afloat
  • laden
  • heavy

Antonyms

  • emptiness
  • meaningless
  • untroubled
  • abstain

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

7. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] constituting the full quantity or extent; complete.

Synonyms

  • whole
  • entire

Antonyms

  • littleness
  • smallness
  • incompleteness

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

8. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] complete in extent or degree and in every particular.

Synonyms

  • total

Antonyms

  • noncomprehensive
  • nonpregnant

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

9. full

adverb. ['ˈfʊl'] to the greatest degree or extent; completely or entirely; (`full' in this sense is used as a combining form).

Synonyms

  • to the full

Antonyms

  • light
  • effortless

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))

10. full

adjective. ['ˈfʊl'] filled to satisfaction with food or drink.

Synonyms

  • nourished

Antonyms

  • unoccupied
  • purposeful

Etymology

  • full (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • fulle (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fullen (Middle English (1100-1500))
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