Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. crack

verb. ['ˈkræk'] become fractured; break or crack on the surface only.

Synonyms

  • check
  • change
  • break

Antonyms

  • failing
  • running
  • worst
  • best

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

Featured Games

Rhymes with Crack

  • post-attack
  • vanvlack
  • knick-knack
  • unpack
  • tabak
  • stracke
  • strack
  • repack
  • oblak
  • dulac
  • chirac
  • beaulac
  • whack
  • trak
  • track
  • trac
  • stack
  • stac
  • spak
  • spack
  • snack
  • smack
  • slack
  • schrack
  • schnack
  • schlack
  • quack
  • plaque
  • placke
  • plack

Sentences with crack


1. Noun, singular or mass
Press the mixture into the crack or chip until it is level with the cabinet surface.

2. Verb, base form
Intensity may be added to this game by using raw eggs that can crack and break if dropped.

Quotes about crack


1. 'Halal in the Family' will expose a broad audience to some of the realities of being Muslim in America. By using satire, we will encourage people to reconsider their assumptions about Muslims, while providing a balm to those experiencing anti-Muslim bias. I also hope those Uncles and Aunties out there will crack a smile!
- Aasif Mandvi

2. Trust is like a mirror, you can fix it if it's broken, but you can still see the crack in that mother fucker's reflection.
- Lady Gaga

3. All parents damage their children. It cannot be helped. Youth, like pristine glass, absorbs the prints of its handlers. Some parents smudge, others crack, a few shatter childhoods completely into jagged little pieces, beyond repair.
- Mitch Albom, The Five People You Meet in Heaven

2. crack

noun. ['ˈkræk'] a long narrow opening.

Synonyms

  • crevasse
  • rift
  • gap
  • chink
  • chap
  • split
  • fatigue crack
  • crevice
  • shift
  • fault
  • volcano
  • geological fault
  • faulting
  • cleft
  • opening
  • vent
  • slit
  • fissure
  • break
  • fracture

Antonyms

  • strengthen
  • disappear
  • make
  • keep down

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

3. crack

verb. ['ˈkræk'] make a very sharp explosive sound.

Synonyms

  • go

Antonyms

  • be well
  • enjoy

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

4. crack

verb. ['ˈkræk'] hit forcefully; deal a hard blow, making a cracking noise.

Antonyms

  • affected

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. crack

noun. ['ˈkræk'] a narrow opening.

Synonyms

  • spark gap
  • lacuna
  • gap
  • opening

Antonyms

  • natural object
  • finish
  • closing
  • inactivity

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. crack

adjective. ['ˈkræk'] of the highest quality.

Synonyms

  • tiptop
  • top-notch
  • tops
  • superior
  • super
  • A-one
  • topnotch
  • first-rate

Antonyms

  • close
  • female
  • unite
  • unify

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. crack

verb. ['ˈkræk'] make a sharp sound.

Synonyms

  • snap
  • go

Antonyms

  • assemble
  • cry
  • integrate

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

8. crack

verb. ['ˈkræk'] pass through (a barrier).

Synonyms

  • go through
  • break through
  • go across

Antonyms

  • come
  • malfunction
  • go off
  • stop

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

9. crack

verb. ['ˈkræk'] break partially but keep its integrity.

Synonyms

  • check
  • craze
  • break
  • alligator

Antonyms

  • go
  • rise
  • precede
  • advance

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

10. crack

noun. ['ˈkræk'] a long narrow depression in a surface.

Synonyms

  • depression
  • impression
  • imprint
  • cranny
  • crevice
  • fissure

Antonyms

  • dematerialise
  • stay in place
  • be born
  • survive

Etymology

  • crakken (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • cracian (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
Synonym.com