Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. world

noun. ['ˈwɝːld'] people in general; especially a distinctive group of people with some shared interest.

Synonyms

  • socio-economic class
  • class
  • social class
  • academia
  • academe
  • Grub Street
  • domain

Antonyms

  • nonbeing
  • female
  • juvenile
  • woman

Etymology

  • world (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • woruld (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

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Words that Rhyme with World War

  • villasenor
  • espectador
  • cavalli-sfor
  • montemayor
  • montefiore
  • bensenyore
  • underscore
  • sotomayor
  • heretofore
  • guarantor
  • balthazor
  • armentor
  • postwar
  • longcor
  • livermore
  • hardcore
  • explore
  • antiwar
  • senor
  • roquemore
  • restore
  • prewar
  • paramore
  • outscore
  • noncore
  • jambor
  • implore
  • gilgore
  • deplore
  • cat-4

2. world

noun. ['ˈwɝːld'] the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on.

Synonyms

  • terra firma
  • Earth
  • geosphere
  • hydrosphere
  • land
  • lithosphere
  • sky
  • globe
  • air
  • atmosphere
  • solar system
  • solid ground
  • earth
  • ground
  • dry land
  • Van Allen belt

Antonyms

  • poor people
  • timid
  • brave
  • rich

Etymology

  • world (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • woruld (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

3. world

noun. ['ˈwɝːld'] everything that exists anywhere.

Synonyms

  • creation
  • galaxy
  • macrocosm
  • heavenly body
  • celestial body
  • closed universe
  • universe
  • extraterrestrial object
  • existence
  • extragalactic nebula
  • estraterrestrial body
  • cosmos
  • natural order
  • natural object

Antonyms

  • uninitiate
  • living
  • poor
  • dead

Etymology

  • world (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • woruld (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

4. world

noun. ['ˈwɝːld'] all of your experiences that determine how things appear to you.

Synonyms

  • real world
  • experience
  • real life

Antonyms

  • existent
  • impossibility
  • nonexistence
  • absence

Etymology

  • world (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • woruld (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. world

noun. ['ˈwɝːld'] people in general considered as a whole.

Synonyms

  • people
  • admass
  • populace
  • public

Antonyms

  • volunteer
  • civilian
  • black
  • white

Etymology

  • world (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • woruld (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. world

noun. ['ˈwɝːld'] a part of the earth that can be considered separately.

Synonyms

  • piece

Antonyms

  • noncitizen
  • clergy

Etymology

  • world (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • woruld (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. world

noun. ['ˈwɝːld'] the concerns of this life as distinguished from heaven and the afterlife.

Synonyms

  • concern
  • earthly concern
  • earth

Antonyms

  • antitype
  • natural object
  • inactivity
  • finish

Etymology

  • world (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • woruld (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

8. war

noun. ['ˈwɔr'] the waging of armed conflict against an enemy.

Synonyms

  • action
  • hot war
  • information warfare
  • civil war
  • battle
  • limited war
  • BW
  • psychological warfare
  • jehad
  • engagement
  • world war
  • warfare
  • combat
  • chemical warfare
  • aggression
  • biologic attack
  • conflict
  • armed combat
  • military action
  • jihad
  • bioattack
  • international jihad
  • war of nerves
  • biological warfare
  • IW
  • chemical operations
  • fight

Antonyms

  • dormant
  • inactivity
  • inactiveness
  • inaction

Etymology

  • werre (Middle English (1100-1500))

9. war

noun. ['ˈwɔr'] a legal state created by a declaration of war and ended by official declaration during which the international rules of war apply.

Synonyms

  • antagonism
  • proxy war
  • hostility
  • state of war

Antonyms

  • agreement
  • keep
  • compatibility
  • defend

Etymology

  • werre (Middle English (1100-1500))

10. war

noun. ['ˈwɔr'] an active struggle between competing entities.

Synonyms

  • warfare
  • drug war
  • trench warfare
  • conflict
  • battle

Antonyms

  • non-involvement
  • non-engagement
  • nonparticipation
  • friendliness

Etymology

  • werre (Middle English (1100-1500))
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