Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. altogether

adverb. ['ˌɔltəˈgɛðɝ'] to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (whole' is often used informally forwholly').

Synonyms

  • entirely
  • whole
  • completely
  • totally
  • wholly

Antonyms

  • no
  • some
  • incomplete
  • natural object

Etymology

  • altogeder (Middle English (1100-1500))

Featured Games

Rhymes with Altogether

  • merriweather
  • get-together
  • birdfeather
  • whether
  • grether
  • weather
  • tether
  • sether
  • raether
  • nether
  • leather
  • heather
  • feather

How do you pronounce altogether?

Pronounce altogether as ˌɔltəˈgɛðər.

US - How to pronounce altogether in American English

UK - How to pronounce altogether in British English

How do you spell altogether? Is it alltogether ?

A common misspelling of altogether is alltogether

Sentences with altogether


1. Adverb
You may have to leave town altogether.

Quotes about altogether


1. Love is not altogether a delirium, yet it has many points in common therewith.
- Thomas Carlyle

2. Lying in bed would be an altogether perfect and supreme experience if only one had a colored pencil long enough to draw on the ceiling.
- Gilbert K. Chesterton

3. Would you mind repeating that? I'm afraid I might have lost my wits altogether and just hallucinated what I've longed to hear.
- Jeaniene Frost, Halfway to the Grave

2. altogether

adverb. ['ˌɔltəˈgɛðɝ'] with everything included or counted.

Synonyms

  • all told

Antonyms

  • fractional
  • misconception

Etymology

  • altogeder (Middle English (1100-1500))

3. altogether

adverb. ['ˌɔltəˈgɛðɝ'] with everything considered (and neglecting details).

Synonyms

  • on the whole
  • tout ensemble

Antonyms

  • diversified
  • unhealthy
  • clothed

Etymology

  • altogeder (Middle English (1100-1500))

4. altogether

noun. ['ˌɔltəˈgɛðɝ'] informal terms for nakedness.

Synonyms

  • birthday suit
  • nudity
  • nakedness
  • nudeness

Antonyms

  • painless
  • processed
  • covert
  • experienced

Etymology

  • altogeder (Middle English (1100-1500))
Synonym.com