Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. tool

noun. ['ˈtuːl'] an implement used in the practice of a vocation.

Synonyms

  • grappling hook
  • gang
  • grappling iron
  • implement
  • eolith
  • grapple
  • garden tool
  • tap
  • clincher
  • tamper
  • grapnel
  • plough
  • saw set
  • hoe
  • puncher
  • paleolith
  • pestle
  • jack
  • muller
  • stylus
  • cutting implement
  • neolith
  • strickle
  • rake
  • hand tool
  • hack
  • shaping tool
  • style
  • tamp
  • pounder
  • fork
  • ram
  • swage
  • grappler
  • power tool
  • drill
  • rounder
  • Jaws of Life
  • plow
  • abrader
  • tamping bar
  • upset
  • punch
  • comb
  • bender
  • lawn tool

Antonyms

  • roughen
  • spread
  • terseness
  • verboseness

Etymology

  • tool (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • tol (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

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Words that Rhyme with Tool

  • apostolopoul
  • istanbul
  • bellefeuille
  • supercool
  • preschool
  • home-school
  • rantoul
  • misrule
  • dzhambul
  • drogoul
  • vipul
  • uncool
  • spruill
  • spruiell
  • spruell
  • sproull
  • sproule
  • ruhul
  • rahul
  • nepool
  • mccool
  • makhoul
  • abdul
  • spool
  • school
  • raul
  • raoul
  • mule
  • muehl
  • kreul

Example sentences of the word tool


1. Noun, singular or mass
Use the edge of the window glaze tool to make the edges of the window glaze straight and even.

Quotes containing the word tool


1. Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything - all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important.
- Steve Jobs

2. I got my first camera when I was 21 - my boyfriend gave it to me for my birthday - but at that point politics was my life, and I viewed the camera as a tool for expressing my political beliefs rather than as an art medium.
- Carrie Mae Weems

3. Work/life benefits allow companies meaningful ways for responding to their employees' needs; they can be a powerful tool for transforming a workforce and driving a business' success.
- Anne M. Mulcahy

2. tool-and-die_work

noun. the craft of making special tools and dies.

Synonyms

  • craft

Antonyms

  • export
  • import

3. tool

noun. ['ˈtuːl'] the means whereby some act is accomplished.

Synonyms

  • agency
  • way
  • means

Antonyms

  • refrain
  • deposit
  • ride
  • stay in place

Etymology

  • tool (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • tol (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

4. tool

verb. ['ˈtuːl'] ride in a car with no particular goal and just for the pleasure of it.

Synonyms

  • joyride
  • ride

Antonyms

  • inactivity
  • inactiveness
  • inaction

Etymology

  • tool (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • tol (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. tool

verb. ['ˈtuːl'] drive.

Synonyms

  • joyride
  • drive

Antonyms

  • kern
  • take
  • block

Etymology

  • tool (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • tol (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. tool

noun. ['ˈtuːl'] obscene terms for penis.

Synonyms

  • peter
  • cock
  • member
  • penis
  • dick
  • phallus
  • pecker
  • putz
  • prick

Antonyms

  • decompress
  • converge
  • good person
  • functional disorder

Etymology

  • tool (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • tol (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. tool

verb. ['ˈtuːl'] work with a tool.

Synonyms

  • work on
  • process

Antonyms

  • well
  • expected
  • nonmember

Etymology

  • tool (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • tol (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

8. tool

verb. ['ˈtuːl'] furnish with tools.

Synonyms

  • provide
  • render
  • furnish

Antonyms

  • freeze
  • demand
  • discontinue
  • disengage

Etymology

  • tool (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • tol (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

9. tool

noun. ['ˈtuːl'] a person who is controlled by others and is used to perform unpleasant or dishonest tasks for someone else.

Synonyms

  • creature
  • slave

Antonyms

  • calm
  • organized
  • untroubled

Etymology

  • tool (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • tol (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
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