Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. stretch

verb. ['ˈstrɛtʃ'] occupy a large, elongated area.

Synonyms

  • be

Antonyms

  • contraction
  • flexion

Etymology

  • strecchen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • streccan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

Featured Games

Words that Rhyme with Stretch Mark

  • question-mark
  • ?question-mark
  • transpark
  • mediamark
  • disembark
  • intermark
  • premark
  • remark
  • embark
  • demark
  • starke
  • stark
  • starck
  • spark
  • sparc
  • quark
  • clarke
  • clark
  • shark
  • sark
  • parke
  • park
  • parc
  • narc
  • merc
  • marque
  • marke
  • marc
  • larke
  • lark

Example sentences of the word stretch-mark


1. Noun Phrase
This cream worked for prevention only in those who had previously acquired stretch marks.

2. Noun Phrase
Avoid trying to suntan away the stretch marks on your buttocks.

2. stretch

verb. ['ˈstrɛtʃ'] extend one's limbs or muscles, or the entire body.

Synonyms

  • tense
  • crane
  • tense up
  • extend
  • strain
  • stretch out

Antonyms

  • unstrain
  • retreat
  • boo
  • moving

Etymology

  • strecchen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • streccan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

3. stretch

verb. ['ˈstrɛtʃ'] extend or stretch out to a greater or the full length.

Synonyms

  • change shape
  • change form
  • extend
  • unfold
  • stretch out

Antonyms

  • move in
  • move out
  • stay
  • rest

Etymology

  • strecchen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • streccan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

4. stretch

verb. ['ˈstrɛtʃ'] become longer by being stretched and pulled.

Synonyms

  • yield
  • grow

Antonyms

  • recede
  • ride
  • follow

Etymology

  • strecchen (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • streccan (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

5. mark

verb. ['ˈmɑːrk'] be a distinctive feature, attribute, or trait; sometimes in a very positive sense.

Synonyms

  • qualify
  • characterise
  • differentiate
  • characterize

Antonyms

  • orientalise
  • inflate
  • depersonalise
  • demagnetise

Etymology

  • mark (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • marc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • mearc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

6. mark

verb. ['ˈmɑːrk'] attach a tag or label to.

Synonyms

  • code
  • point
  • trademark
  • badge
  • brandmark
  • attach
  • brand
  • tag
  • label

Antonyms

  • diversify
  • take in
  • unweave
  • convict

Etymology

  • mark (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • marc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • mearc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

7. mark

verb. ['ˈmɑːrk'] designate as if by a mark.

Synonyms

  • betoken
  • distinguish
  • blaze
  • dimension
  • signalize
  • indicate
  • bespeak
  • signal
  • differentiate
  • signpost
  • signalise
  • buoy

Antonyms

  • stabilise
  • centralise
  • demulsify
  • deflate

Etymology

  • mark (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • marc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • mearc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

8. mark

verb. ['ˈmɑːrk'] mark by some ceremony or observation.

Synonyms

  • keep
  • commemorate
  • observe

Antonyms

  • rejuvenate
  • personalize
  • orientalize
  • centralize

Etymology

  • mark (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • marc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • mearc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

9. mark

verb. ['ˈmɑːrk'] make or leave a mark on.

Synonyms

  • draw
  • alter
  • raddle
  • label
  • striate
  • asterisk
  • post
  • bespot
  • change
  • tag
  • underline
  • trace
  • star
  • stripe
  • dimple
  • dot
  • delineate
  • underscore
  • stake
  • crisscross
  • ink
  • stigmatise
  • tip
  • brand
  • modify
  • line
  • spot
  • stigmatize
  • flag
  • describe

Antonyms

  • unscramble
  • strengthen
  • decentralise
  • clarify

Etymology

  • mark (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • marc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • mearc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

10. mark

noun. ['ˈmɑːrk'] a number or letter indicating quality (especially of a student's performance).

Synonyms

  • rating
  • valuation
  • grade
  • percentile
  • score
  • decile
  • grade point
  • centile
  • quartile

Antonyms

  • depersonalize
  • dissimilate
  • increase
  • demilitarize

Etymology

  • mark (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • marc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • mearc (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
Synonym.com