Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. sense

verb. ['ˈsɛns'] perceive by a physical sensation, e.g., coming from the skin or muscles.

Synonyms

  • perceive
  • comprehend

Antonyms

  • insignificance
  • unimportance
  • significant

Etymology

  • sense (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sens (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

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Words that Rhyme with Sense Of Humor

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Example sentences of the word sense-of-humor


1. Noun Phrase
There’s a fine line between having a sense of humor and being the office clown.

2. Noun Phrase
If the person has a sense of humor, throw in a funny anecdote or joke.

3. Noun Phrase
If your boss has a good sense of humor, then incorporate this into the farewell gift.

4. Noun Phrase
Approach your in-laws with a sense of humor.

2. sense

noun. ['ˈsɛns'] a general conscious awareness.

Synonyms

  • sense of responsibility
  • sense of direction
  • knowingness
  • consciousness
  • awareness
  • cognisance

Antonyms

  • inanimateness
  • insentience
  • effector
  • sensitizing

Etymology

  • sense (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sens (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

3. sense

noun. ['ˈsɛns'] the meaning of a word or expression; the way in which a word or expression or situation can be interpreted.

Synonyms

  • import
  • acceptation
  • meaning
  • word meaning
  • signified
  • signification
  • word sense

Antonyms

  • judgment in personam
  • judiciousness
  • injudiciousness
  • approval

Etymology

  • sense (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sens (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

4. sense

noun. ['ˈsɛns'] the faculty through which the external world is apprehended.

Synonyms

  • sentiency
  • module
  • sensibility
  • sensitiveness
  • sentience
  • sense modality
  • mental faculty
  • sensory faculty
  • sensory system
  • modality
  • sensitivity
  • faculty

Antonyms

  • unperceptiveness
  • insensitiveness
  • sentient
  • insentient

Etymology

  • sense (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sens (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

5. humor

noun. ['ˈhjuːmɝ'] a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter.

Synonyms

  • sport
  • laugh
  • satire
  • repartee
  • humour
  • wittiness
  • caricature
  • subject matter
  • cartoon
  • sketch
  • esprit de l'escalier
  • jeu d'esprit
  • imitation
  • wit
  • caustic remark
  • bite
  • play
  • pungency
  • ribaldry
  • mot
  • substance
  • joke
  • witticism
  • message
  • jape
  • content
  • impersonation
  • gag
  • fun
  • sarcasm
  • jest
  • irony
  • bon mot

Antonyms

  • approval
  • disapproval
  • formalism
  • natural

6. humor

noun. ['ˈhjuːmɝ'] the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous.

Synonyms

  • humour
  • playfulness
  • sense of humor
  • sense of humour

Antonyms

  • cheerful
  • glad
  • elation
  • pull out

7. humor

noun. ['ˈhjuːmɝ'] a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling.

Synonyms

  • feeling
  • distemper
  • temper
  • humour
  • good humor
  • amiability
  • good temper
  • sulk
  • good humour
  • ill humour
  • sulkiness
  • peeve
  • ill humor

Antonyms

  • ill humor
  • stupidity
  • addition
  • failure

8. sense

noun. ['ˈsɛns'] sound practical judgment.

Synonyms

  • good sense
  • gumption
  • judgment
  • logic
  • horse sense
  • discernment
  • mother wit
  • nous
  • road sense
  • sagacity
  • judgement
  • sagaciousness

Antonyms

  • insensibility
  • unconsciousness
  • insensitive
  • sensitive

Etymology

  • sense (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sens (Old French (842-ca. 1400))

9. humor

verb. ['ˈhjuːmɝ'] put into a good mood.

Synonyms

  • humour
  • pander
  • indulge

Antonyms

  • overact
  • underact
  • tightness
  • immovability

10. sense

noun. ['ˈsɛns'] a natural appreciation or ability.

Synonyms

  • appreciation
  • grasp

Antonyms

  • unsusceptibility
  • reversal
  • judgment in rem

Etymology

  • sense (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • sens (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
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