Synonyms
Etymology

1. pectoral

noun. ['ˈpɛktɝəl'] either of two large muscles of the chest.

Synonyms

  • pectoralis minor
  • musculus pectoralis major
  • greater pectoral muscle
  • pecs
  • pectoral muscle
  • smaller pectoral muscle
  • skeletal muscle
  • musculus pectoralis minor
  • thorax
  • pectoralis major
  • chest
  • pectus
  • pectoralis
  • musculus pectoralis

Etymology

  • pectoralis (Latin)
  • -alis (Latin)

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Words that Rhyme with Pectoral Fin

  • verduin
  • kyoung-min
  • yan-bin
  • wherein
  • violin
  • vanryn
  • mcquinn
  • mcminn
  • mclinn
  • mclin
  • mcglynn
  • mcglinn
  • glavine
  • eldwin
  • chang-hsin
  • chagrin
  • bongjin
  • yalin
  • within
  • therein
  • o'quinn
  • oguinn
  • o'guinn
  • oflynn
  • o'flynn
  • mcguinn
  • mcginn
  • levin
  • laminne
  • kaylynn

Example sentences of the word pectoral-fin


1. Noun Phrase
Draw the outline of a dorsal fin and two pectoral fins onto an old cereal box.

2. Noun Phrase
Within each species males also tend to have more stripes on the pectoral fins.

3. Noun Phrase
The female pectoral fins only reach the base of the caudal peduncle.

4. Noun Phrase
The pelvic and pectoral fins are a similar color to the belly.

2. pectoral

adjective. ['ˈpɛktɝəl'] of or relating to the chest or thorax.

Antonyms

  • flexor

Etymology

  • pectoralis (Latin)
  • -alis (Latin)

3. pectoral

noun. ['ˈpɛktɝəl'] an adornment worn on the chest or breast.

Synonyms

  • adornment

Etymology

  • pectoralis (Latin)
  • -alis (Latin)

4. fin

noun. ['ˈfɪn'] a stabilizer on a ship that resembles the fin of a fish.

Synonyms

  • vane
  • stabilizer
  • ship

Antonyms

  • subtract
  • majority
  • minority
  • ground

Etymology

  • fin (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fin (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
  • פֿינף (Yiddish)
  • fimf (Old High German (ca. 750-1050))

5. fin

noun. ['ˈfɪn'] one of a set of parallel slats in a door or window to admit air and reject rain.

Synonyms

  • louver
  • spline
  • louvre
  • jalousie

Antonyms

  • natural object
  • stay in place
  • open
  • get off

Etymology

  • fin (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fin (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
  • פֿינף (Yiddish)
  • fimf (Old High German (ca. 750-1050))

6. fin

noun. ['ˈfɪn'] the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one.

Synonyms

  • five
  • quint
  • quintuplet
  • Phoebe
  • quintet
  • digit
  • cinque
  • fivesome
  • figure
  • 5
  • pentad
  • Little Phoebe

Antonyms

  • overdress
  • differ
  • disagree
  • fall short of

Etymology

  • fin (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fin (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
  • פֿינף (Yiddish)
  • fimf (Old High German (ca. 750-1050))

7. fin

verb. ['ˈfɪn'] show the fins above the water while swimming.

Synonyms

  • swim

Antonyms

  • unhealthy
  • ill

Etymology

  • fin (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fin (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
  • פֿינף (Yiddish)
  • fimf (Old High German (ca. 750-1050))

8. fin

noun. ['ˈfɪn'] organ of locomotion and balance in fishes and some other aquatic animals.

Synonyms

  • appendage
  • ventral fin
  • pelvic fin
  • tail fin
  • fish
  • dorsal fin
  • member
  • extremity
  • caudal fin
  • ray

Antonyms

  • divide
  • multiply
  • integrate
  • differentiate

Etymology

  • fin (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fin (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
  • פֿינף (Yiddish)
  • fimf (Old High German (ca. 750-1050))

9. fin

noun. ['ˈfɪn'] one of a pair of decorations projecting above the rear fenders of an automobile.

Synonyms

  • auto
  • car
  • motorcar
  • ornament
  • automobile
  • machine
  • tailfin
  • ornamentation
  • decoration

Antonyms

  • fire
  • defuse
  • unmuzzle
  • underdress

Etymology

  • fin (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fin (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
  • פֿינף (Yiddish)
  • fimf (Old High German (ca. 750-1050))

10. fin

noun. ['ˈfɪn'] a shoe for swimming; the paddle-like front is an aid in swimming (especially underwater).

Synonyms

  • flipper

Antonyms

  • homocercal fin
  • nonmember

Etymology

  • fin (Middle English (1100-1500))
  • fin (Old French (842-ca. 1400))
  • פֿינף (Yiddish)
  • fimf (Old High German (ca. 750-1050))
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