Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. hereafter

adverb. ['hɪˈræftɝ'] in a subsequent part of this document or statement or matter etc..

Synonyms

  • hereinafter

Antonyms

  • pastness
  • present

Etymology

  • hræfter (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

Featured Games

Words that Rhyme with Hereafter

  • drafter
  • rafter
  • laughter

How do you pronounce hereafter?

Pronounce hereafter as hɪˈræftər.

US - How to pronounce hereafter in American English

UK - How to pronounce hereafter in British English

Example sentences of the word hereafter


1. Adverb, comparative
Unfinished floors will have slightly more steps hereafter.

Quotes containing the word hereafter


1. There are no coincidences in life. What person that wandered in and out of your life was there for some purpose, even if they caused you harm. Sometimes, it doesn’t make sense the short periods of time we get with people, or the outcomes from their choices. However, if you turn it over to God he promises that you will see the big picture in the hereafter. Nothing is too small to be a mistake.
- Shannon L. Alder

2. Hereafter she is only my sister in name; not because I disown her, but because she has disowned me.
- Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

3. Here the whole world (stars, water, air,And field, and forest, as they wereReflected in a single mind)Like cast off clothes was left behindIn ashes, yet with hopes that she,Re-born from holy poverty,In lenten lands, hereafter mayResume them on her Easter Day."(Epitaph for Joy Davidman)
- C.S. Lewis

2. hereafter

noun. ['hɪˈræftɝ'] life after death.

Synonyms

  • life-time
  • afterlife
  • life
  • lifetime
  • lifespan
  • kingdom come

Antonyms

  • mortality
  • impermanence
  • birth
  • death

Etymology

  • hræfter (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

3. hereafter

noun. ['hɪˈræftɝ'] the time yet to come.

Synonyms

  • tomorrow
  • by-and-by
  • offing
  • futurity
  • future
  • time to come
  • time
  • manana

Antonyms

  • outgoing
  • retrospective
  • future
  • postmeridian

Etymology

  • hræfter (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
Synonym.com