Synonyms
Antonyms
Etymology

1. slowly

adverb. ['ˈsloʊli'] without speed (slow' is sometimes used informally forslowly').

Synonyms

  • tardily
  • easy

Antonyms

  • sudden
  • fast
  • hurried

Etymology

  • -ly (English)
  • -lice (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • slow (English)
  • slaw (Old English (ca. 450-1100))

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Rhymes with Slowly

  • albendazole
  • petricioli
  • buttacavoli
  • stromboli
  • romagnoli
  • guacamole
  • capozzoli
  • trimboli
  • spagnoli
  • sinopoli
  • licavoli
  • fargnoli
  • andreoli
  • rispoli
  • ravioli
  • pedroli
  • meserole
  • mattioli
  • mascioli
  • grigoli
  • dercole
  • dascoli
  • consoli
  • cerasoli
  • campoli
  • bartoli
  • anatoly
  • anatoli
  • zeroli
  • unholy

How do you pronounce slowly?

Pronounce slowly as sˈloʊli.

US - How to pronounce slowly in American English

UK - How to pronounce slowly in British English

Sentences with slowly


1. Verb, base form
Use your clean fingers to slowly brush back the substrate until you reach your crab.

2. Adverb
To stretch the muscles on the sides of your neck, slowly turn your head from side to side.

Quotes about slowly


1. As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.
- John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

2. Every black film feels like it's Tyler Perry, and that just needs to stop. But people seem to slowly be looking for what else is out there - 'Is there something else besides this type of humor?' 'I'm tired of seeing men in dresses.'
- Issa Rae

3. When I realized I could write lyrics and let someone that I knew listen to them, but not know that the song was about them - say it was a girl. I could write this song about how I feel about this girl, I could play it to them. I just loved it, because all of the words would speak to them. I could see them slowly falling in love with me.
- King Krule

2. slowly

adverb. ['ˈsloʊli'] in music.

Antonyms

  • increase

Etymology

  • -ly (English)
  • -lice (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
  • slow (English)
  • slaw (Old English (ca. 450-1100))
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